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This blog was updated on a daily basis for about two years, with those daily entries ceasing on December 31, 2013. The blog is still active, however, and we hope that people stopping in, who find something lacking, will add to the daily entries.

The blog still receives new posts as well, but now it receives them on items of Wyoming history. That has always been a feature of the blog, but Wyoming's history is rich and there are many items that are not fully covered here, if covered at all. Over time, we hope to remedy that.

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Sunday, January 13, 2013

January 13

1794     President George Washington approved a measure adding two stars and two stripes to the American flag, following the admission of Vermont and Kentucky to the union.

1846  President Taylor dispatches U.S. troops to Texas in anticipation of trouble with Mexico.

1877   Corporal  Charles A. Bessey, Company A, 3d U.S. Cavalry wins the Congressional Medal of Honor for an action near Elkhorn Creek, Wyo., 13 January 1877. Citation. While scouting with 4 men and attacked in ambush by 14 hostile Indians, held his ground, 2 of his men being wounded, and kept up the fight until himself wounded in the side, and then went to the assistance of his wounded comrades.

"Elkhorn" is a common  name for creeks in Wyoming, so exactly where this occurred I do not know.

1885  Wyoming Territorial Governor William Hale died.

1888.  The post office at Ft. D. A. Russel re-established.

1890  Union Pacific carpenters went on strike in Cheyenne.  Attribution: Wyoming State Historical Society.

1899  US Senator F.E. Warren introduced a bill for the erection of an Army post near Sheridan, Wyoming.

1899  Wyoming Governor  Jack R. Gage born.

1929   Wyatt Earp died in Los Angeles.

1943  It is reported that 2,600 school teachers are employed in Wyoming.  Attribution.  Wyoming State Historical Society.

2015  Legislature commences general session.

Elsewhere:

1929   Wyatt Earp died in Los Angeles.

1937   The United States bars US citizens from serving in the Spanish Civil War.   This occurred a the same time that left wing American volunteers were forming the Lincoln Battalion/Brigade, which would first see action in February, 1937.  Foreign volunteers, in addition to outright foreign military missions, saw some action on both sides of the war, with some countries actually seeing volunteers on both sides of the war.

1950  The Soviet Union boycotts the UN Security Council over the issue of which government is the legitimate Chinese government, a move that will ultimately allow the UN to intervene in the Korean War.

4 comments:

  1. My guess is that is Elkhorn Creek that flows from the Laramie Mountains into Glendo reservoir as some sites reference it was between Laramie and Fort Fetterman. Elkhorn Creeks headwaters are east of the old Fort Fetterman road from Laramie to Douglas.

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  2. That's a good guess.

    There's another Elkhorn Creek that runs through Casper, and starts in Casper Mountain. It had an Army manned telegraph station on it in the 1860s, but not in so far as I know in the 1870s. That location withstood an Indian attack in the mid 1860s, but I don't know of it being in any scraps in the 1870s. It's a possibility as well, however, as it ran past the Oregon Trail in this location.

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  3. I knew about the Casper area Elkhorn Creek but really didn't think it was 'between' Laramie and Fort Fetterman but guess it could have been that site also. We'll probably never know for sure. No GPS in 1877. Look how far we've come!

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  4. You may very well be correct, and I missed what you noted about other sources indicating that the creek was between the Ft. Fetterman Road and Ft. Laramie. That couldn't have been the Casper area creek.


    And, by 1877, the forts around Casper were abandoned. No doubt the Army continued to patrol the trails out this far, but the next fort to the west would have been quite some distance.

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